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what mnemosyne will write about when she writes

January 14, 2009

Mnemosyne 

Although Mnemosyne is best known for being mother of the Muses in greek mythology, I find her most compelling as the goddess of memory. Apart from her famous offspring, she is also a collector of words and inventor of language.

Talk about a dream avatar for a writing biblio/logophile like me. After all, who can resist being mired in myth and being the topic of epic poetry, all while gracing a slew of Pre-Raphaelite paintings?

That settled, let me try and put down what this blog is about or what one might expect to read on this blog.

Hmm….

I guess it could be anything and most likely a lot of nothing. 

The fact is, you can try going without sleep to get your writing done when you have kids but be prepared for some monumental backlash. Wander into the local library as Zombie Mom with 2 kids in tow for the nth time and you’ll discover how high your librarian can arch an eyebrow.

I remember smiling when my Comparative Lit prof said she hides in the bathroom to read. As it turns out, these days it’s a smile of “good idea..” rather than “gross!”.

If by some miracle I do find the time to jot anything down, I hope the reader forgives me as this blog will be no more than a vent for forays into the written word. Hopefully no less than that- writing is an extremely lonely endeavor.

Anyway, this is what I read in the bathroom today:
Albert Camus, referring to the technique of Balthus, wrote that it was the distinction of painters to be able to pin down fleeting images glimpsed briefly on a journey upstream towards forgotten springs.
For Camus, the true painters were those who, like great writers, conveyed the impression that this act of “pinning down” had just taken place, just as if an airplane had stopped in mid-air. 
All the “figures” in great paintings made Camus feel, as he put it, “that they have only just stopped moving and that, through the miracle of art, they go on living and yet are no longer perishable.”

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